zvelo and our partners help protect hundreds of millions of end users while browsing online. Providing security, web filtering, and parental controls is integral to zvelo’s core mission. Learn more about the company and how we’re working with partners and the community to improve the internet for all.

zvelo Donated an Afternoon to Volunteer at Project C.U.R.E.

Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes After zvelo held its Q1 Quarterly Company Meeting in the morning, its employees headed over to Project C.U.R.E.’s International Headquarters in nearby Centennial, Colorado. Project C.U.R.E. (Commission on Urgent Relief and Equipment) was founded in 1987 and its mission is to identify, solicit, collect, sort and distribute medical supplies and services according to the imperative needs…

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In The Stack, Jeff Finn, CEO of zvelo, asks whether there are enough incentives for consumers to be concerned about the security of their IoT devices…

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes For customers purchasing Internet of Things (IoT) devices – a group that either includes or will include just about every one of us soon enough – it’s easy to get excited about the idea of smart light bulbs, speakers, thermostats, power outlets, and a host of other convenient, connected hardware the market offers. The chief selling point of most IoT devices is their functionality and simplicity, enabling us to control or track everything in our lives with our voices or our phones.

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Why IoT Manufacturers Aren’t Helping Prevent Botnet Attacks

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes *****The following article, by Jeff Finn, appears within the Featured News section of IoT Evolution Magazine’s web site and was originally published on February 23, 2017. Malicious hackers seeking out unsecured devices to add to their botnet armies is not new, but the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution is making their jobs all too easy. According…

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zvelo’s CEO, Jeff Finn, Offers Insight Into IoT Security Future

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes On an increasingly massive scale, cybercriminals are repurposing connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices installed within our homes. These hackers use malware to enlist our smart thermostats, speakers, lights, and more as soldiers for their botnet armies – used in coordinated massive attacks causing security breaches that threaten the integrity of the internet.

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